Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan

gewendet · angewendet · angewandtMARCO A. CASTILLO
MIHO DOHI
MANUEL GORKIEWICZ
KATHARINA GROSSE
SONIA LEIMER
ISA MELSHEIMER
MANFRED PERNICE
KARIN SANDER
MICHAEL E. SMITH
JESSICA STOCKHOLDER

Group Exhibition
8 Oct 2022 – 21 Jan 2023
Domgasse 6
1010 Vienna
Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Group Exhibition gewendet · angewendet · angewandt; 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan

Featured Works

Marco A. Castillo, Familia Ramírez Trujillo, 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Marco A. Castillo
Familia Ramírez Trujillo, 2022
MDF, glass
55 x 42 x 9 cm (21 5/8 x 16 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.)
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Marco A. Castillo, Familia Calvo Socarras, 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Marco A. Castillo
Familia Calvo Socarras, 2022
MDF, glass
55 x 42 x 9 cm (21 5/8 x 16 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.)
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Marco A. Castillo, Familia Valdes González, 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Marco A. Castillo
Familia Valdes González, 2022
MDF, glass
55 x 42 x 9 cm (21 5/8 x 16 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.)
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Miho Dohi, Study 5, 2019 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Miho Dohi
Study 5, 2019
plaster
17 x 25 x 16 cm (6 3/4 x 9 3/4 x 6 1/4 in.)
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Manuel Gorkiewicz, 5 Trinkgläser mit Karaffe;, 2014 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Manuel Gorkiewicz
5 Trinkgläser mit Karaffe;, 2014
Murano glass mouth blown by Davide Fuin in Murano, Venice; unlimited edition
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Manuel Gorkiewicz, Mann, 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Manuel Gorkiewicz
Mann, 2022
colored paper; in collaboration with Matilda Heistinger
approx. 250 x 310 cm (98 x 122 in.)
2 Zoom Views
Katharina Grosse, Untitled, 2006 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Katharina Grosse
Untitled, 2006
acrylic on skateboard, ed. 61/100, unique, individually painted; publisher & manufacturer: Mekanism Skateboards, Paris; signed, numbered and stamped "Mekanism" on the reverse
78 x 19 cm (30 3/4 x 7 1/2 in.)
3 Zoom Views
Sonia Leimer, SA, 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Sonia Leimer
SA, 2022
steel, work wear, foam, silkcreen; unique
90 x 40 x 43 cm (35 1/2 x 15 3/4 x 17 in.)
2 Zoom Views
Sonia Leimer, MO, 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Sonia Leimer
MO, 2022
steel, work wear, foam, silkcreen; unique
90 x 40 x 43 cm (35 1/2 x 15 3/4 x 17 in.)
2 Zoom Views
Sonia Leimer, MI, 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Sonia Leimer
MI, 2022
steel, work wear, foam, silkcreen; unique
90 x 40 x 43 cm (35 1/2 x 15 3/4 x 17 in.)
2 Zoom Views
Sonia Leimer, DI, 2022 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Sonia Leimer
DI, 2022
steel, work wear, foam, silkcreen; unique
90 x 40 x 43 cm (35 1/2 x 15 3/4 x 17 in.)
2 Zoom Views
Sonia Leimer, Money Box (Model), 2016 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Sonia Leimer
Money Box (Model), 2016
clay, Fat Lava glaze
h 27 cm, dm 14 cm (h 10 5/8, dm 5 1/2 in.)
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Sonia Leimer, Money Box (Model), 2016 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Sonia Leimer
Money Box (Model), 2016
clay, Fat Lava glaze
h 30 cm, dm 16 cm (h 11 7/8, dm 6 5/16 in.)
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Sonia Leimer, Money Box (Model), 2016 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Sonia Leimer
Money Box (Model), 2016
clay, Fat Lava glaze
h 31 cm, dm 17 cm (h 12 3/16, dm 6 5/8 in.)
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Isa Melsheimer, Tuch (Plan 1), 2018 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Isa Melsheimer
Tuch (Plan 1), 2018
fabric, sewing threat, artificial pearls
125 x 100 cm (48 1/4 x 39 3/8 in.)
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Isa Melsheimer, Trekking Mask IX, 2018 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Isa Melsheimer
Trekking Mask IX, 2018
fabric, wire, thread
35 x 25 x 12 cm (13 3/4 x 9 3/4 x 4 3/4 in.)
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Manfred Pernice, Hocker-Set (3)'Linda', 2013 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Manfred Pernice
Hocker-Set (3)'Linda', 2013
wood, lacquer, photocopy, acrylic glass, metal, synthetic material, porcelain saucer, can filled with handwash paste
148 x 48 x 48 cm (58 1/8 x 18 7/8 x 18 7/8 in.)
4 Zoom Views
Karin Sander, Eggplant / from the series Kitchen Pieces, 2012 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Karin Sander
Eggplant / from the series Kitchen Pieces, 2012
eggplant, stainless steel nail
dimensions variablel
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Karin Sander, Banana / from the series Kitchen Pieces, 2012 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Karin Sander
Banana / from the series Kitchen Pieces, 2012
banana, stainless steel nail
dimensions variablel
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Karin Sander,  Red Onion / from the series Kitchen Pieces, 2012 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Karin Sander
Red Onion / from the series Kitchen Pieces, 2012
red onion, stainless steel nail
dimensions variablel
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Karin Sander, Glass Drop 15, 2019 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Karin Sander
Glass Drop 15, 2019
glass
45 x 13 x 19 cm (17 3/4 x 5 1/8 x 7 1/2 in.)
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Michael E. Smith, Untitled, 2015 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Michael E. Smith
Untitled, 2015
wood, baby jumpsuit, corrals
approx. 80 x 44 x 27 cm (31 1/2 x 17 5/16 x 10 5/8 in.)
3 Zoom Views
Michael E. Smith, Untitled, 2020 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Michael E. Smith
Untitled, 2020
pan, leather
72 x 39 x 15 cm (28 3/8 x 15 3/8 x 5 7/8 in.)
3 Zoom Views
Jessica Stockholder, Circle Viewer, 2019 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Jessica Stockholder
Circle Viewer, 2019
6 magnets, 6 flat head screws, paper, hardware, acrylic medium, acrylic paint, thin rope, wire and wire key rings
81 x 52 x 8 cm (31 7/8 x 20 1/2 x 3 1/8 in.)
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Jessica Stockholder, Untitled, 2010 — Galerie nächst St. Stephan
Jessica Stockholder
Untitled, 2010
carpet, ping pong paddle, acrylic paint, price tags, nail
45 x 27 x 2,5 cm (17 1/2 x 10 1/2 x 1 in.)
2 Zoom Views
read inGerman

gewendet • angewendet • angewandt

In the exhibition titled gewendet • angewendet • angewandt (changed used applied), Galerie nächst St. Stephan Rosemarie Schwarzwälder is showing ten artists who straddle the line between applied arts, design, crafts, and fine arts in its gallery at Domgasse 6. The productive connection between applied and fine arts — in other words, between objects, the functionality of which in their daily use demands a rational and logical design process, and objects that fulfill a need for a purely aesthetic approach to creating artworks that do not have a “function” in themselves — has a long tradition in Vienna. Following the idea of the Gesamtkunstwerk (a total work of art), the artists of the Wiener Werkstätte (Vienna Workshop) wanted to introduce art to all areas of daily life, with the goal of making this city the center of good taste within the culture of applied arts. Everyday objects, furniture, fashion, lamps, and even jewelry, as well as graphic designs for books or posters were designed with the highest possible technical workmanship and the desire for independence and beauty in mind. This development began with the creation of progressive working conditions for craftspeople and culminated in replacing the overabundant French and Belgian Art Nouveau ornaments with a geometric, abstract language of forms that was extraordinarily long-lasting and still displays a timeless elegance today.
 
Responding to the short-lived, cheap mass products of a globalized consumer society with high-quality, sustainable craftsmanship is not only an expression of escapism in a society in the age of the Anthropocene, which is characterized by the energy crisis and climate change. The revival of handicrafts, the interest in materiality, and the wish for a self-imposed reduction and concentration is also an expression of a society suffering from cultural exhaustion due to overstimulation — a society in which our own physically perceivable world is increasingly in danger of becoming a virtual and illusionary reality. When people began to withdraw to their private worlds because of the pandemic, and when the home was transformed from a place of retreat into a permanent site of production, the boundaries between private life and work life began to dissolve, and the design of our own living environments came more to the fore again.
 
For this exhibition, Rosemarie Schwarzwälder has meticulously selected works by artists represented in her gallery, as well as artists she feels close to. In contrast to their heterogeneous artistic approaches, the exhibited works share certain questions in common: What contexts have these objects and materials been “taken” from? In which combinations have they been “used”? How have their original meanings and perceptual situations “changed” as a result, and how can they be used, or “applied”? Looking at these works as a group also makes it possible to reflect on the historical, political, and cultural influences in each work and the changes in associations and interpretations caused by the current shifts in socio-economic and ecological fault lines.
read inGerman
Sonia Leimer is showing new chairs that she has developed by upcycling materials she used in a project in the waiting area of the Arbeiterkammer (Chamber of Labor) in Vienna. Her exploration focuses on workwear and its historical color coding, symbolic traditions, and practical requirements (orange as the color for garbage collectors; black for chimney sweepers; white, blue, and turquois for doctors and nursing staff; green for gardeners, and so forth). By printing a selection of photographs on these fabrics showing her hands doing artistic work in the studio — for example, measuring, welding, or applying varnish — she not only creates usable unique objects for sitting on; she also inscribes her own craft-based activities onto other professional fields.
 
Katharina Grosse is known for her painterly environments produced with the help of a spray paint gun. These take the shape of gigantic indoor and outdoor installations — for example, on the facades or in the stairwells of buildings. Her softly oscillating color gradations also spread across fabric, furniture, or everyday objects. In the shop window of the gallery, a hand-sprayed, unique edition of a skateboard is shown without wheels, liberating it from its original use value and letting it mutate into a sculpture. Through its intentional placement close to the street, it maintains its metaphorical character as an expression of freedom and movement.
 
Manfred Pernice uses off-the-shelf materials like plywood panels, tiles, iron, or concrete, which he combines with drawings, texts, and newspaper clippings to create his cylindrical or prismatically fragmented sculptures that are reminiscent of stacked cans or containers. In this way, he provides an open system of reference that plays with cultural codes, memories, or signifiers that are associated with a certain context.
 
This approach is also favored by the American artist Jessica Stockholder, who creates room-like collages or pictures you can walk around in by combining familiar, everyday objects with odd, painted plywood boards. The small assemblage consisting of pieces of carpet, a table-tennis paddle, price tags, and nails refers to the tradition of the Fluxus movement, which worked toward a fluid transition between art and life and favored the artistic idea and process over the actual artwork. While Stockholder’s works transgress the genres of sculpture and painting, they always remain committed to an expanded painterly space through color compositions and effects.
 
Her student Michael E. Smith, on the other hand, creates collages out of objects that focus on the metaphorical power of history inscribed on everyday objects and materials. A stuffed baby onesie seems to crumple like a maltreated body leaning against the wall, its head replaced by a colorless coral skeleton hovering like a fan. The arrangement resembles a portrait of human vulnerability in the face of the man-made ecological disaster.
 
Architecture, fine arts, applied art, and decorative arts all intersect in the MDF wall objects by the Cuban artist Marco A. Castillo, making them appear like utopian urban models of a socialist society that has been in transition since the 1990s. While he refers to the aesthetic expectations and promises associated with the Latin American history of modernism, socialist design, and Cuban traditions, Castillo also focuses on the current political developments in Cuba as well as the achievements of its modern architects and designers, which are often forgotten today.
 
Manuel Gorkiewicz has realized an adaptation of a paper curtain that he originally folded out of US letter-size paper during his MAK Schindler residency in Los Angeles to replace the original sliding door in the Mackey Apartments built by R.M. Schindler in 1939. For this, Gorkiewicz developed a folding technique using the formal language of Art Deco or Zig-Zag style, which was prevalent at the time, as a model and contrast to the De Stijl vocabulary of Schindler’s Mackey building. By reconstructing his curtain for the barrel vault in the gallery on Domgasse using the DIN A4 paper size, Gorkiewicz connects the history of the Austrian architect with his own, giving R.M. Schindler, who never returned to Austria after emigrating in 1914, a symbolic presence in Vienna again.
 
Finally, Karin Sander radically pushes the “transformation” of our familiar mode of perception to the limits in her treatment of everyday objects in which she employs a minimal shift in perspective. Using simple nails, Sander mounts real fruit and vegetables on the wall at the same distance from each other. In this way, the food becomes “realistic” sculptures. When transferred to the context of art, the uncanny power of our cultural convention to regard objects hanging on the wall as art manifests itself. How much we have already become alienated from our physical reality is not only demonstrated by the way eating and food is fetishized on social media and cooking is stylized into social events, but also by the fact that the conditioning of our eyes by photographic images lets Sander’s “sculptures” seem like three-dimensional color photographs.
Photo
  • Markus Wörgötter

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